Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
MSNBCW 3
MSNBC 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
tough talk for? >> former president bill clinton-be chatting with dr. nancy snyderman about his latest project. >>> but first, a check of the weather. >> okay. for tomorrow, frigid conditions in the northeast, snow around the great lakes, air stagnation alerts continue for the pacific northwest, mild through the south, saturday, more of the same. in fact, matt, doesn't change much, snow showers on the upper great lakes, then on sunday, sunday, we are looking at snow squalls around the great lakes again. arctic express, bitterly cold air starts to push n going to be sunny and cool throughout the southern tier of states. nice and mild in the pacific >>> hey, good morning to you. 8:32. live look, hazy over san jose. a lot of sunshine and a warmer afternoon on tap. temperatures are going to hit the mid-60s. 66 in gilroy. 64 in san jose. 64 in redwood city and san francisco as well. we'll climb into the upcoming weekend. they called the mavericks. that competition taking place on sunday. have a great day. >> and that's your latest weather. >>> let's get caught up on what's happening with al
with her patented tough talk for? >> former president bill clinton-be chatting with dr. nancy snyderman about his latest project. >>> but first, going on, for the weekend and tomorrow, we have frigid conditions in the northeast. snow around the great lakes. air stagnation will continue for the pacific northwest and saturday, more of the same. and in fact, matt, it doesn't change much and snow showers around the upper great lakes and on sunday sunday, we're looking at snow squalls around the great lakes and again, arctic and bitterly cold air pushes in and it will be sunny and cool throughout the southern tier of states and mild in the pacific northwest on into the southwest. that's what's going on around the country. here's what's happening in your neck of the woods.. >>> good morning. since before dawn, we have had rain falling and the metro you're and we're going to have this rain falling south and east of washington here for the rest of the morning hours and neither and west maybe just a few sprinkles of rain. and then later this afternoon, we may get these temperatures that you now
made bill clinton survive that and robert downey survive his incidents. those are likable, i don't want to call them rogues, but likable but i don't think the same could apply to armstrong? >> armstrong is completely robotic. there is no charisma there. there is no like you said character. think of hugh granted or even charlie sheen. there is loveable about the train wreck you like to watch. you know, he is an interesting guy. >> neil: what makes you think that lance won't enjoy the same come back? >> people really i think view lance as someone who has really, this is about power and ego and greed. >> neil: what about the fact he had cancer, near death, won't that offset the bad stuff? >> absolutely not. he has been doing this for decades. he even said on the interview, this was a lie of mythic proportions. that he continued to perpetuate. there is no sense -- he never said he thought he was doing nothing wrong. this is what his p.r. machine was telling him. >> neil: he was doing this to move on his life and capitalize and make some money? >> i don't think it was so much about making mo
bill clinton, but they were a slightly more reasonable party in terms of reaching compromises on other issues with clinton from that point forward. >> let me ask you. if they're just threatening a downgrade, again, what is your view on how bad that is for the u.s. economy? ? i mean, there are lots of perilous things that will kick into place. >> in the short-term, sadly, perversely not so bad. >> right. >> i don't think it's going to have a huge impact on -- short-term. the question is it's a long-term thing, and that's two, three, four, five, ten years out, and that's what you are fighting against. yeah, short-term, i don't think anyone will care. >> nobody goes to fish to decide -- >> why do they rate treasuries? go, fitch. go away, s&p. we know what the interest rates are. that's how people think of debt. >> what we are capable of, and are we -- >> pa what our standing should be and what our rating should be. there's no question. i don't think in the short-term we have any -- and, sadly, that gives no cover to anybody in washington on this issue. >> it does not. well, we will certai
? >> it was more about the individual popularity of the one barack obama plus bill clinton. after all, it was a decisive victory, but it was a victory for the man, not necessarily the party. >> is that how you read it, john? do you see this being an obama victory as opposed to a liberal victory are or they intertwined? >> i never want to disagree too much with one of the greater politicians in american history, but i would suggest that there was a little more party there. you won a couple u.s. senate seats that they weren't supposed to win sometimes because of republican flubs. 1.4 million more people voted for democrats for the house than voted for republicans, only gerrymandering kept the house where it is. and so i think that this man has done a lot to build a broad progressive coalition, but your core question is the important one. can you hold that coalition together? >> mayor -- >> let me say this to you though, i believe that it would have been a more telling benefit for the party if it had been nancy pelosi re-emerging as the speaker of the house and if democrat governors had
part. lyndon johnson did, bill clinton did. he doesn't. >> so even though the kids are going to be out of the house, so to speak, you don't expect him to change? >> i think it would being a great. designee just made a joke the kids are moving out, come on over. >> it's >>> the cars of tomorrow, they're on display today at the detroit auto show. we'll show you the cars and the truck that give you the best bang for your buck. >>> and take look at the groundbreaking new corvette stingray. all right. pretty. you're watching "cbs this morning." t he do it with >> announcer: this morning's eye opener at 8:00 is brought to you by sponsor with an inside story on shingles. democrats? e >>> planning for your retirement is more important than ever, so why are more people raiding their 401(k)s to pay their bills? "moneywatch" jill schlesinger is back and she'll show you why it's so important to save and why it's so important to never touch your 401(k). >>> a little later? >>> i'm charlie d'agata in london and i'll tell you why the great british butler is making a g
traditional progressive approach. as for your first question, absolutely, john. hillary clinton would, in fact, keep papering over this issue, although i do think there would at least be some kind of a bill bradley-style challenge. in 2000 al gore faced a challenge from bill bradley on his left. it wouldn't be as robust as bradley was in 2000, i don't think -- and that wasn't terribly robust in 2000, but i think there would be some nominal challenge from her left that would say, you know, democrats can't go back to sort of clinton-style politics. now, given her popularity, as you mentioned, john, across demographic and across ideological lines, i think it would be fairly minimal. there would be some kind of challenge there, i believe. >> gene, jonathan just mentioned sherrod brown's sense that, you know, they weren't going to go near entitlements because entitlements, that's who the democratic party is. that's who they are. entitlements are now 20% think of federal spending. how do the democrats, the republicans, how does this country survive economically without addressing entitlements? and b
to be lofty, inspirational and unifying, if anything? >> you know, i was reading bill clinton's second inaugural where he talks about, you know, the status quo nature of government which we see today as well, that americans a americans are to turn this division the government the way it is. the petty bickering they did for big things. i think the president wants to try to talk about where he feels he can have the most impact in his second term domestically and internationally which is a huge piece, by the way. because i think his first term internationally was about coming home, was about sort of pulling america back from its projection of power. there are so many both real problems and crises but also opportunities for the president. so i think that the speech is really about where he wants to have the most impact. and i think that's how he'll be judged, and that's where people will really take notice of what he says. >> david, before you tell us who's on "meet the press" this sunday, back to the speech for just a moment. do you think there's any chance at all that the president will
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)